Blue Lives Matter Pt. 2

Netflix / Eng
LukeCaged

Netflix Eng

BIO
Got locked out of my LukeCage account, so here I am as LukeCaged
LukeCagedmore
Sep 25, 2018 32 Comments

Two studies have found that at least 40% of police officer families experience domestic violence, (1, 2) in contrast to 10% of families in the general population.(3) A third study of older and more experienced officers found a rate of 24% (4), indicating that domestic violence is 2-4 times more common among police families than American families in general. A police department that has domestic violence offenders among its ranks will not effectively serve and protect victims in the community.5, 6, 7, 8 Moreover, when officers know of domestic violence committed by their colleagues and seek to protect them by covering it up, they expose the department to civil liability.7

Footnotes, sources, and original text:

http://womenandpolicing.com/violenceFS.asp#notes

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TOP 32 Comments
  • Amazon / Eng
    onMyWay

    Amazon Eng

    BIO
    AWS
    onMyWaymore
    Wait, you mean to tell me the people that deal with the garbage of society are adversely affected by said garbage of society?

    Next you’ll tell me combat troops are adversely affected by shooting people and seeing their friends shot.
    Sep 25, 2018 24
    • Amazon / Eng
      onMyWay

      Amazon Eng

      BIO
      AWS
      onMyWaymore
      > propaganda
      How?
      > violence already trending down
      so at very worst, these policies were neutral, and at best, they helped solve the problem.
      > cooked books
      How?
      > appear to work
      They objectively worked, you can’t twist the results.
      > did all this good, with some bad
      If the total good outweighs the total bad, what’s the problem?
      Sep 26, 2018
    • Credit Karma EllisDee25
      1. Propaganda. City police, the media, politicians all supported these policies early on regardless of effectiveness in the abstract. It met their interests so it was “effective” even as residents complaints of harassment increased.

      2. Violence was trending down, therefore claims that these policies have a correlation to the decreases of violence need to actually prove the link.

      3. Cooked books. Look it up, the LAPD fudged crime data to make it appear that crime was down more than it actually was.

      4. “It objectively worked” see number two - this need to actually be proven.

      5. Is it worth it? IDK, policies that focus policing on things like selling individual cigarettes... ask Eric Garner if this kind of policing reduces violence... oh, you can’t because he’s dead by police choke-hold after selling loose cigs. Ask the NYPD whistle blowers that exposed the PD of having secret arrest quotas for officers. The number and payout amounts for brutality by the NYPD doubled from 1992 to 1994. Do poor lives matter? if so, then these policies have not been worth it.
      Sep 26, 2018
    • Intel DSPN81
      2. I shared the chart that showed an acceleration in the drop after Bratton started in NYC in 1994 and LA in 2002, much faster than other cities who didn’t use his tactics until later.

      3. Bratton was better at cooking the books than other cities? Im sure every city cooks the books to make their officials look effective to some regard. Why do you think he was more effective at it? Rahm clearly hasn’t been very good at cooking his books.

      5. Poor people in those areas would disagree with you- living in a non-war zone is far preferable to what existed before Bratton policies.

      Speaking of data - you didn’t share any population based data to showcase that police are disproportionately targeting areas other than on the basis of crime rate. I presume you are alluding to a racial bias? Don’t fall for the opportunistic propaganda of the progressive Left- they are trying to monetize outrage. Didn’t see a lot of people over the age of 40 or families protesting in the riots, did you?

      Violent crime is way down at the same time policing got much more data-driven in targeting areas of high crime. If people in those communities don’t like it, they have the ability to vote for different representation that will change the policy.
      Sep 26, 2018
    • Credit Karma EllisDee25
      Yes, you see a lot of people over 40 and families at anti police-violence protests. Ever been to a black (or even sometimes a multi-ethnic Catholic) church in a city? Until BLM, probably most of these protests have been organized through churches in the 90s and 00s - churches are still heavily involved today - just joined by a more involved younger generation now. (I’d love to see you go to a black church in a low income area of a city and tell the middle aged people there about how we should all be grateful for the fantastic work in policing done by the local force and city hall.)

      No, people in poor areas don’t have a different option for voting in most cases. These policies were mostly pushed by liberal politicians who run most cities. From the 90s until the recession the options were tough on crime Republicans or tough on crime Democrats. This was a bi-partisan effort backed by local developers as well as the courts and federal government. Speaking of the “liberal” option...

      #3 I’m glad you mentioned Rahm Emanuel... so how are his “broken window” policies working out in Chi?

      https://www.dnainfo.com/chicago/20130313/chicago/mayor-endorses-broken-windows-policing-submits-toughened-ordinance.amp

      #2 - again, if violence was generally declining before and declined across the board, what’s the evidence that this policy was the cause of decreased violent crime? On the other hand, gang truces in LA in the early 90s lead to clear and immediate reductions in violence.

      #5 no shit, people don’t like violence—but again, what about #2. I’ve lived in areas like this most of my life - some people do disagree with me about cops, but most people also don’t trust the cops and see that they are violent, speed through neighborhoods for kicks, harass young people... they just mostly think “this is the way things are”.

      Finally, please let me know why you think Eric Garner’s death was worth not having people sell individual cigarettes on the corner?
      Sep 26, 2018
    • Intel DSPN81
      Because a sample size of one never matters for population level policy.

      The only thing worse than the police is not having the police.
      Sep 26, 2018
  • Microsoft btheb
    Your post's is arguing for the opposite of what your title is alluding to.
    Sep 25, 2018 1
    • Apple iPhone XR
      I think that's the "bait". Attracting people who think they will be reading about something they agree with and then throw them something entirely opposite just to see their reaction. 🤷‍♂️
      Sep 25, 2018
  • Sirius XM DkPiIm
    OP - will you refer me to Netflix? I like the wlb that allows you to be on Blind all day.
    Sep 25, 2018 0
  • Apple eurp31
    Here’s my take on it. Our hiring bar for cops is really low. Police academy. It’s easy to get through. Other countries that don’t have a problem with cops busting heads treat cops at a very dignified profession with a harder quality gate. Think quantico level vetting.

    A cop in this country is a prime job for Biff von fuckface from high school who bullied kids and needed a career where he can inflict power and authority on other people.

    We need to look at quality going into this system to get quality out of the system. Treat cops at the same level as the FBI.

    It won’t fix everything, but I’ll improve the quality of our law enforcement.
    Sep 26, 2018 1
    • Amazon / Eng
      onMyWay

      Amazon Eng

      BIO
      AWS
      onMyWaymore
      Is it low? Do you have examples of departments that have low bars? Because there certainly isn’t a consistent bar across the country thousands of different departments.
      Sep 26, 2018
  • Microsoft JustFixIt
    Won’t somebody please think of the children???
    Sep 25, 2018 0
  • Microsoft TrumpWins
    "...according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, black offenders committed 52 per cent of homicides recorded in the data between 1980 and 2008. Only 45 per cent of the offenders were white."

    https://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/htus8008.pdf

    https://www.channel4.com/news/factcheck/factcheck-black-americans-commit-crime
    Sep 25, 2018 0