Building career on Microsoft technology

Microsoft userg7
Mar 19 16 Comments

Hi, throughout my career I have worked on C#/.net/Azure etc. I have not exposed myself to Java/open source/AWS technologies.

Will this be a bottleneck problem in the long run of my career? If so how to mitigate it?

PS: I work for Microsoft Azure

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TOP 16 Comments
  • VMware / Eng
    tyxS31

    VMware Eng

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    Microsoft, Hulu
    tyxS31more
    Not an issue, I had a similar 18+ years of C# - I used C# since its beta days- worked for Microsoft for many years, and then transitioned to Java, Linux, AWS in pretty much few weeks, I also worked with a lot of Python, Scala, ... etc. It's all code, you will get the hang of it, it is only a problem if you make it one
    Mar 19 3
    • New / Eng bumerang
      Imagine if you have never touched MS stack and started with Java/Scala right away? Wouldn't it be nice?
      Mar 19
    • C# can be a beautiful language.
      Mar 19
    • VMware / Eng
      tyxS31

      VMware Eng

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      tyxS31more
      @New, no it wouldn't, actually the more languages I use the more I appreciate C#, most languages are stealing features from it anyway.
      Mar 20
  • Amazon GiftOfFear
    Java sux compared to C#
    Mar 19 4
    • Micro Focus / Product GWOz11
      Said no one ever.
      Mar 20
    • Microsoft / Eng MissingNo.
      Most developers agree according to surveys. It's a much more modern language with way more features.
      Mar 20
    • VMware / Eng
      tyxS31

      VMware Eng

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      tyxS31more
      @Micro said anyone who worked with both
      Mar 20
    • Microsoft / Eng MissingNo.
      I've work substantially with both and C# is better. C# has async await, nullable types, namespaces, delegates, structs, types without erasure. C# is also adding features at a faster pace than Java so it has a chance or catching up to languages like Kotlin and Swift.
      Mar 20
  • Oracle kw4/(
    Yes it will. My first job was at Microsoft. When I finally left I was surprised nobody used ms technology other than ms and other non tech companies. Using open source was an eye opener.

    Only ms experience in resume is also a mood killer. We interview a lot of Microsoft people at seattle oci and we always put ms people in a different microscope.
    Mar 19 2
    • Google / Eng catburglar
      What do you mean different microscope?
      Mar 20
    • Salesforce psiM71
      For every question you ask them about having used X or Y tech or product they’ll say “no, but I’ve used our own at Microsoft”, so it’s hard to gauge their skill as some of those are private.
      Mar 22
  • Google UkHq61
    Nop. Its all the same and in many ways C# and VS are much nicer and easier to read and debug than Java/IntelliJ.

    The technologies/APIs are very similar too. e.g. gRPC/Stubby is basically a cleaner version of WCF, protobuf is bond, most of the Azure APIs are available under different names but very similar implementations on aws/gcp (azure/gcp cloud function/aws lambda).

    Ultimately non of the big companies work in a vacuum and its the same people moving around implementing the same features.
    Mar 20 0
  • Qualtrics / Sales
    '🈚🀄🎶🈶

    Qualtrics Sales

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    Microsoft, Qualtrics
    '🈚🀄🎶🈶more
    Short answer is no. But what you do want to understand the underlying system and design which are the transferrable knowledge. If you understand how a distributed key-value store works, it doesn't matter whether it's called "Amazon DynamoDB" or "Azure CosmosDB". If you understand how to asynchronous code works in C#, you would be wise to avoid writing blocking code in Java. If you just want to be "cool" and doing the latest stuff, Go/Scala/Kotlin start to get more popular than Java, so you are again one step behind.
    Mar 20 0
  • Avanade wwsg
    Today’s tech stacks are much more interdependent thanks to cloud, network effects, social coding and cross platform integration - As long as you keep up with the latest in your tech stack, keep abreast with Cloud, Dev Ops tooling and keep any eye out for latest trends and stay current and amenable to learning new platforms, then the divide between MS tech and Open Source is really not an issue. (It’s the ability to keep learning, that is what’s hard) IMO MS tech stack is really wonderful btw

    How to do this practically - let’s say your Azure, then do a side project with AWS lambda - not all that different to azure functions anyway etc..also look for places were MS tech overlaps or integrates with OS tech- e.g as a FED you may integrate .net core web api backend with Angular or React as a front end and thus learn a popular front end framework...

    It also helps to prune/ diversify and target your resume to the position you want- recruiters and managers just follow buzzwords so try to keep multiple resumes- one for each target role you desire and drop any Visual Basic projects from the dark past ;)
    Mar 21 0
  • Salesforce / Mgmt GQch66
    It will be a problem, so it's probably worth branching out. That said, my early career (1997-2000) was C, C++, and Java (at Sun, no less) but nothing but .Net and HTML JavaScript from then until my transition into full time management about 6 years ago. During that time, never had an issue finding work in the Boston area.
    Mar 20 0

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