CS Degree and career progression

Tesla W/e
Oct 23, 2018 14 Comments

I have an MS in engineering management and Bachelors in Mechanical Engineering. I want to get my masters in CS thoughts? Does Udacity or other software related combination courses here and there would suffice? I know kinda open ended but, just wanted to see what your thoughts are.

Ps : just downloaded python and watching udacity videos.

TC: 90-100k now non IT background 6+yoe in Mnfg and wanted to shift to software down the line.

comments

Want to comment? LOG IN or SIGN UP
TOP 14 Comments
  • In the same boat, non-CS bachelors and masters. I just started studying python, let me know if you want to practice together
    Oct 23, 2018 1
    • Tesla W/e
      OP
      Cool ! Send me a pm
      Oct 23, 2018
  • Microsoft / Product
    Brazuka

    Microsoft Product

    PRE
    Bain & Company
    Brazukamore
    This is a sad tc. With that master's you got perhaps you could change to PM and get 200k tc immediately
    Oct 23, 2018 2
    • Tesla W/e
      OP
      Thanks.. Yes! Would a 1 year graduate certificate work or do I have to get MS?
      Oct 23, 2018
    • Tableau keh661j3
      If you want to be a PM, get an MBA. Plenty of engineering grads pivot into tech that way
      Oct 23, 2018
  • Twitter / Eng
    TWTCortex

    Twitter Eng

    PRE
    Microsoft, LinkedIn
    TWTCortexmore
    Get a CS degree. There’s a big difference between learning a programming language and learning computer science. Look into OMSCS at Georgia tech if you don’t want to go back to school - it’s essentially Udacity except you get a real degree that’s worth something
    Oct 23, 2018 1
    • Tesla W/e
      OP
      Looks Awesome! I might actually go for it! Thanks
      Oct 23, 2018
  • New aLuu55
    I don’t know why I keep seeing people who want to get jobs in software engineering say they are learning python. Python....!

    Don’t get me wrong, it’s a great language. Not really my cup of tea, but it has its uses.

    But I’ve NEVER seen a single person who actually uses python in their day jobs. Most software roles don’t touch python at all. If you want my advice, decide what type of software engineering you’d like to do (ie. backend? Web front end? Mobile?) and learn a language suited to that.

    For example, if you want to do web front end work, learn JS and React.
    Oct 23, 2018 6
    • New aLuu55
      CVPR, that’s a pretty tiny field compared to most software engineering roles.

      If you want to get a job as a software engineer, almost no one will hire you to do python. You’ll have a much better shot by learning JavaScript or Java or Swift....
      Oct 24, 2018
    • New aLuu55
      Yes, ML is absolutely a small field when you compare it to the vast size of software engineering in general. This is a fact. Going to an ML heavy career fair in the Bay Area will give you a pretty warped perspective.

      And unless you have a PhD or are extremely good in mathematics, it doesn’t really matter how good your python skills are. In ML, writing code is the easiest part of the job.
      Oct 24, 2018
    • New aLuu55
      Let’s say you have five close friends and 3 of them are firefighters. Does that mean that you can extrapolate and say 60% of all jobs are firefighters?

      No. As I said before, the vast majority of software engineering roles are not in ML, and it’s still a small niche field. It’s growing like crazy to be sure, but it’s still comparatively small.

      And you might know new grads getting $225K offers in ML, but in my experience they’re the exception to the norm. Most ML positions especially at bigger companies want to see masters/PhDs for these ML roles.
      Oct 25, 2018
    • New aLuu55
      Also, writing code (python) is the easiest part of machine learning. Knowing how to manipulate large datasets, hyperparameters, statistics, dealing with problems like overfitting, etc. is MUCH more difficult than simply learning python and the tensorflow API.
      Oct 25, 2018
    • New aLuu55
      And if you went off your personal experience, you’d probably end up thinking half of all jobs in the US are for ML. But that’s simply not true.

      And that’s the only point I’m making.

      The OP said he wanted to get into CS/software engineering. The vast, overwhelming majority of jobs in software engineering have nothing to do with ML. Python is one of the least useful languages to know if you want to become a SWE, except for ML, which IS a niche field.
      Oct 26, 2018