Google really ask questions like Leetcode #753?

Dropbox CodeGoru
Jul 5 38 Comments

I cannot believe Google interviewers ask questions require to use algorithms like Burrows-Wheeler transform. Anyone seen this question @ real interviews?
I don’t think even John von Neumann could induce it within 45 minutes. I know there are alternative solutions easier than Burrows-Wheeler but still I don’t think anyone can reach to the correct solution during interviews.

https://leetcode.com/problems/cracking-the-safe/

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TOP 38 Comments
  • Man this is stupid. Cut the balls of that interviewer and put them in that safe. Let's see how fast he can crack it.
    Jul 5 1
  • This comment was deleted by original commenter.

    • Googlers ask banned questions all the time
      Jul 6
    • Facebook l3sn4r
      It is called Unexpected hanging paradox. You think that if they promised a surprise question, they can't ask a leetcode question because you expect it and it will not be a surprise. So you think that they will ask something different and you stop leetcoding.
      Then on the interview they ask you a leetcode question and it becomes an utter surprise to you. Exactly as they said.
      Jul 6
    • Amazon kudobear
      deep
      Jul 6
  • Google jdiehhd
    Pretty well known problem actually if you studied euler path, having that said terrible interview question.
    Jul 5 6
    • Amazon / Eng utu
      Never even heard of Eluer path
      Jul 5
    • Akuna Capital / R&D 3-SAT
      An algorithm for constructing it or a theorem about existence?
      Jul 5
    • Facebook l3sn4r
      Eluer path is something strange, no one knows about it. But Euler path (7 bridges of Konigsberg) is explained on the first day of the graph theory course.
      Jul 5
    • Google jdiehhd
      I said it is a horrible question. Just easy if you know Euler path which I was for example taught while in school.
      Jul 6
    • Amazon / Eng utu
      Sorry bad joke (and bad question, IMO). OP spelled Euler wrong multiple times.
      Jul 6
  • Facebook l3sn4r
    Leonard Euler would have easily solved it 250 years ago without even having a computer. And now you have all books and all knowledge in the world and can't solve something that people knew 200years ago? Shame on you.
    Jul 5 2
    • Databricks / Data
      data4u

      Databricks Data

      PRE
      500 Startups
      data4umore
      Lol wat
      Jul 5
    • Amazon broke&dumb
      But this wasn't an interview for a math professor position. It was for software engineering.
      Jul 6
  • New galo
    Oh yeah I got asked that at Youtube once. Interviewer didn't seem to expect me to finish it though, was mostly interested on what I'd come up with and the blueprint of how I'd code it.
    Jul 5 3
    • Dropbox CodeGoru
      OP
      If it is not expected to be resolved in 45 minutes, what is the rubric to get “hire” sign? Probably bfs implementation of Euler path in sudo code without any major hint?
      Jul 5
    • New galo
      Well I came up with a solution using tries, trying to eagerly test combinations that weren't tested yet. Interviewer agreed it'd work and I started coding. 5 min before time was up he switched me to explain the rest since I'd ran out of time. I'm certain he had positive feedback (got 4 out of 5 and my last one I flunked badly).
      Jul 6
    • Salesforce modijee
      Pseudo code
      Jul 6
  • Google / Ops Huhf13
    We all know ole 753.
    Jul 6 0
  • BMW BBGW30
    Brings up another point. Are you guys studying and memorizing named algorithms like this? There are a bunch for graph problems too but I feel like a lot of them are just academic optimizations like Heaps algorithm for instance. Seems like a way better approach to just memorize patterns and solve things with those. In the case of permutations, backtracking
    Jul 6 1
    • Facebook l3sn4r
      People memorize a transition from an unclear "safe" to a clear "graph with nodes and edges". And then it becomes a more standard question.
      Jul 6
  • Amazon / Eng
    weeeeeeee

    Amazon Eng

    BIO
    AWS
    weeeeeeeemore
    I was asked word ladder for SDE1 when I joined a year ago lol.
    Jul 6 0
  • Google / Eng
    zQgN83

    Google Eng

    PRE
    LinkedIn
    zQgN83more
    I also got this question at Google. Was hired.
    Jul 6 5
    • How did you perform in this question? Do you know the algorithms in advance?
      Jul 6
    • Google / Eng
      zQgN83

      Google Eng

      PRE
      LinkedIn
      zQgN83more
      I did well. I made progress on the question but didn't fully "solve" it or know any algorithm in advance.
      Jul 6
    • Thanks. Did you receive many hints to made progress?
      Jul 6
    • Nutanix 1adja134
      It’s all about the state transition diagram. Once you have that you can solve it completely
      Jul 6
    • Google / Eng
      zQgN83

      Google Eng

      PRE
      LinkedIn
      zQgN83more
      I don't remember getting hints.
      Jul 6
  • Bloomberg **NeWaY**
    I was asked to, "Design a Maze, which should be hard to crack, explain the algorithm and code it" (when this question popped up from the interviewer after he asked several other questions about my career and background, I had 25 minutes left). Blew it.
    Jul 19 2
    • Nutanix 1adja134
      Yeah it might be difficult. Sounds like you have to find a spanning tree of sorts
      Jul 19
    • Nutanix 1adja134
      A spanning tree that connects source to destination in a matrix of square walls I guess
      Jul 19
  • Bloomberg EVAL<GO>
    Anyone who has taken a junior level bioinformatics class knows BWT, get your shit together
    Jul 6 2
    • Bloomberg / Eng
      FSCK<GO>

      Bloomberg Eng

      PRE
      Amazon
      FSCK<GO>more
      Pretty sure that I got something similar to this for my Bloomberg interview
      Jul 6
    • Bloomberg EVAL<GO>
      Isn’t Dropbox supposed to have insanely hard interviews? Why is this guy crying?
      Jul 6
  • Barclays PLC GirisÇikis
    For my second phone interview question, I got asked similar to"Guess the word" by a very rude interviewer. And the wording was convoluted with very little hints.
    Jul 6 0
  • Nutanix 1adja134
    I actually loved my learning process through that problem. State transition diagrams are super helpful.
    Jul 6 0
  • Medallia Maximus8
    My eyes
    Jul 5 0