Incredible offer, but dislike the company/product. Take it?

Amazon / Eng mn12jj
Sep 4, 2018 31 Comments

My dilemma is simple: I have a (surprising) job offer from a company I originally was planning to use for practice. On paper, this offer is excellent: it's an up-level (again, on paper; have already been working at the expected scope for a few years) and a 30%+ pay increase over what I'm already making, let alone what I'm "supposed" to make. Based on my research, this offer is in the realm of the absolute most I could realistically hope to get, anywhere.

Meanwhile, promos are hard to come by in my org and I will reach my four year compensation cliff in a few months (huge pay cuts by 2020 if I stay and don't get promoted), so I'm definitely motivated to leave sooner or later--both for more money and a chance to do something different.

No brainer, right? Except I don't believe in either the new company or its core product at all--in fact, I'm not even merely indifferent but actually (mildly) dislike both--and I can't even force myself to get excited about going there.

I'm on cruise control at Amazon and can continue to interview with abandon if I choose to do so. Before anybody asks: I'm not going to reveal the company or the break down of the offer, simply because I'm trying to avoid biased answers in either direction. They're definitely well-known, though.

Edit: not OCI :)

Current L5 @ Amazon; TC ~275k (actual target is around 200k)

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TOP 31 Comments
  • F5 Networks / Eng cardib
    If you just run behind TC at your experience level, you're in for a horrible 3-5 years at your next company.
    Sep 4, 2018 6
    • F5 Networks / Eng cardib
      Definitely.

      As one progresses through their career, you start to have more responsibility and impact at your work, specifically the product what you work on.

      One of two things can happen:
      1. You really like the product and believe in the bigger picture. When you do that, you give it your best and you'd find ways to get things done. Resulting in great performance, which would lead to growth, higher earnings.

      2. If you don't like the product or believe in it's grand scheme. You start disliking your work, you won't think creatively, inputs to innovating it would be minimal. This might further lead to bad team dynamics, possible low performance (PIP, etc), not liking what you do on a daily basis. And, you'd end up hating your work.

      People think passion is cliche. But, I feel passion is super important. Because that dictates how involved and happy you'd be on the product what you're building.
      Sep 4, 2018
    • Spotify WizzAir
      Makes sense. After certain level, extra tc is not going to change quality of life as much as what happens during the 8hrs in office.
      The hard part is finding one's passion.
      Sep 5, 2018
    • F5 Networks / Eng cardib
      Yep :)

      And, yeah, finding one's passion is hard. But if you don't like the product, company - you atleast know where not to be.

      Experimenting is the key to find what your true passion is. Also, one's passion changes over time. So keeping up with it is also a key.
      Sep 5, 2018
    • Spotify WizzAir
      My passion is in pure mathematics but it doesnt make any money so I am a programmer now. :(
      Sep 6, 2018
    • Amazon / Eng mn12jj
      OP
      I have to generally agree with the notion that passion is an important factor, which is what prompted me to start this discussion in the first place. Does it matters above all else? No; that's the sort of thinking arguably that did a lot of damage to the millennial generation. But it should still, if possible, be interesting or at least tolerable enough to keep you engaged and motivated over time.
      Sep 6, 2018
  • Cisco rkHq23
    It's FB isn't it
    Sep 4, 2018 1
    • Oracle BSJr60
      Probably Oracle
      Sep 4, 2018
  • Amazon iooD08
    +1...don't. I know an L7 who declined a $1M+ offer at Oracle. Don't compromise if you see red flags as the market is superhot.
    Sep 4, 2018 0
  • Comcast keysersözæ
    You're pretty much done at Amazon. You said so yourself. You're judging something at face value though. Take the job and give it a chance. If you don't like it look again.
    Sep 4, 2018 0
  • Google / Eng 🍑☁️
    At that level, you can have a pretty big impact on the product. If you think the product is dumb, you can try to make it less dumb.
    Sep 4, 2018 0
  • Microsoft LKui75
    Don’t just do it for the money. It can be painful and that might eventually show up in your output. You are smart. Just be patient and you will find something that you will enjoy
    Sep 4, 2018 0
  • Facebook bfcc
    So +30% current, or +78% target (guessing you'll make a bit more than target after cliff, maybe 220k-250k).

    I'd do it for a year or two. Use it as negotiation leverage for next role, or line up interviews fast and use current offer. Usually would say mission, passion, blah blah blah. But this can potentially be life changing money for you, speed up FIRE time by many years if that was one of your goals.

    And bets on Oracle as well. OCI numbers be out there.
    Sep 4, 2018 6
    • Facebook bfcc
      What do you mean not as much as claimed, do you expect the stock to fall? Or Target bonus to be a lie?
      Sep 5, 2018
    • Amazon / Eng mn12jj
      OP
      Both.
      Sep 5, 2018
    • Facebook bfcc
      Wow. If there's that much doubt already then I wouldn't do it. Just use the offer as leverage later on against other offers.
      Sep 5, 2018
    • Amazon / Eng mn12jj
      OP
      Fair. They want an answer by next week, but I figure I can just black out details on the offer letter and use it as leverage later.

      I actually like the specific team, project, and manager, and so I would normally have taken it without much further thought (my personal policy is to join a team, not a company, which is how I ended up at Amazon--wouldn't have come here without a good reason to do so). But in this case, I'm really struggling to get past both the risk and the soft factors. I don't think it's a particularly bad company, per se (I mean...I already work at Amazon), I just don't really care about their product.
      Sep 5, 2018
    • Facebook bfcc
      Screenshot the offer for later use. Those document links expire.

      Always your choice. If I have enough experience, and enough results to prove my predications as correct, I would go with my gut. Red flags can be subtle, but obvious if you went through it before.
      Sep 5, 2018
  • Microsoft limelight
    Won't give you any advice if you are not willing to reveal the company name. What a douchebag
    Sep 6, 2018 2
    • Cisco rkHq23
      Ppl are only this 2cool4school about Facebook. If it was oracle he'd just say it
      Sep 6, 2018
    • Amazon / Eng mn12jj
      OP
      "Douchebag." Ha! I like you. We can be friends. Also: it's not Facebook, either.
      Sep 9, 2018
  • Cadence foome
    Go with your gut. Has your gut ever been wrong?
    Sep 4, 2018 1
    • Zillow Group / Eng
      nuvk72

      Zillow Group Eng

      PRE
      Microsoft
      nuvk72more
      Yea .. yesterday I felt I needed to go but then I didn’t
      Sep 5, 2018
  • Expedia / Eng conbro
    How long did you work at Amazon? YoE?
    Sep 4, 2018 1
    • Amazon / Eng mn12jj
      OP
      Just shy of 4 years at Amazon. 5.5 FTE (i.e. excluding a year's worth of internships) total.
      Sep 5, 2018
  • Microsoft Rendezvou
    Lol is it Oracle?
    Sep 4, 2018 0
  • If it’s a polarizing brand, you just might find your mild dislike going to mild like over time. Maybe.
    Sep 4, 2018 0
  • What if you're wrong about the company, and the stock goes 10x in 10 years time? Or what if you're right, and you wasted 1 year at the company for nothing?

    Which one will you regret more? Choose the other one.
    Sep 4, 2018 0
  • Symantec / Product bosspm
    You will probably regret taking the offer and you have a -ve perception about the product and company.
    Sep 4, 2018 0

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