Misc.

Should children of college admissions cheaters be expelled?

Microsoft / Biz DevMemeGenX
Mar 14

Should the kids be punished for the illegal activities of their parents (assuming they didn't know what their parents were doing for them?)

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  • New ORFM42
    I thought it has been like that for a long time? Parents intentionally donate to school in exchange for guranteed admissions.

    Is that considered illegal in the US?
    Mar 149
    • Oscar 🐨koala
      Nope
      Mar 14
    • Google / Eng
      crazier

      GoogleEng

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      14 yoe engineer in tech
      craziermore
      Some colleges may openly have seats for kids of big donors.
      But this case is about seats reserved for meritorious students, who cant pay large donations. The merit can be SAT, sports, other achievements.
      The rich people stole these seats by cheating. So they actually stole from some deserving non-rich kids, which makes it so bad
      Mar 14
    • Trustwave / Consultant
      ubtK76

      TrustwaveConsultant

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      ubtK76more
      Donating to a school is NOT a quid pro quo for admissions.
      Not to mention that the current scandal isn't even about donating to the school. The parents allegedly paid a guy whose business was based in falsifying tests, and bribing coaches to take kids as athletic recruits when they didn't even do the sport. The parents also allegedly tried to disguise the payments as charitable contributions to a non-profit for underprivileged kids.
      Mar 14
    • Expedia Max8
      To be clear, this scandal is not about kids being admitted based on a large public/charitable donation. It's surfaced that admission officials, test administrators, coaches, etc had been individually/personally paid off to allow blatant cheating, falsifying scores, and making placement recommendations for kids who did not qualify.

      Allowing students to be admitted on the basis of a large charitable donation is a different topic, and a bit more "grey" than blatant bribery to individuals to falsify and blatantly cheat (as in, allowing a third party person to take the test in the place of the student).
      Mar 14
    • Intel yhgth
      Let’s say it was based on a large disclosed donation to a private institution - everyone agrees that’s fine, right?
      Mar 14
    • Google / Eng
      crazier

      GoogleEng

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      craziermore
      It is not illegal. Whether it is fine or not, is debatable
      Mar 14
    • Google / Engbgduonfe
      Not saying it's right or fair, but at least there's some benefit to the other students
      Mar 14
    • Intel yhgth
      Yes, provided they really love that art history / athlete-only gym the money went towards.
      Mar 14
    • Expedia Max8
      Agreed, Universities are significantly enabled by charitable donations. Trading a single enrolment in exchange for the enrichment of the student community through the donations is (while maybe not precisely fair and equal) more acceptable. Also, fairness aside, if it an "official" mechanism or arrangement the university has established, then that is their decision - they don't need 100% consensus of the population to do that.

      On the other hand, lining the pockets of individuals to allow you to break the rules, and paying off people to turn their head and cheat is... Well, dirty.

      The irony is, it is merely prestige and pride that would drive you to do this. These kids will have had their life's path paved with gold. While they may be wealthy, they will very likely never be successful, because they've never learned how to do something for themselves - they've only learned to buy success. Eventually, their mom's money will run out.

      So no, they are not setting their kids up for success, just prestige and a false sense of status.
      Mar 14
  • Trustwave / Consultant
    ubtK76

    TrustwaveConsultant

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    ubtK76more
    Voted yes after noting that there is no way the kids could not have known. They signed the applications, they knew they didnt take the SATs that day, etc. Some of them even boasted about it, and some have withdrawn before they get expelled.
    Mar 141
    • Spotify llamallama
      The FBI said that most of the kids didn't know about it. I'm pretty sure they've done more due diligence than you.
      7d
  • Oscar 🐨koala
    No and dont care. This is to say everyone at facebook should be fired after the scandals.
    Mar 141
  • Monster unholy!
    Only if they knew about their parents' scheme.
    Mar 140
  • New sparked
    No, but if they don’t flunk out the colleges should be investigated for grade inflation and just in general whether they still deserve their accreditation.
    Mar 140
  • Microsoft MSFTBRO
    If by expelling the students the school is able to take on more qualified students the following year, then yes.
    Mar 141
    • Google / Eng
      crazier

      GoogleEng

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      craziermore
      Even if not, then also should do it, to make an example
      Mar 14
  • Getting into college does not give you a degree from Ivy League school. You have to graduate in order to get a degree. I personally think just like Switzerland, people should be allowed to get into any public universities they want.
    7d0
  • Uber chumpu
    Kick them back to community college , and have them reapply as a transfer student
    Mar 140
  • Intel yhgth
    The embarrassment they will carry for the rest of their collegiate careers / lives seems adequate. I’d be surprised if the ones still in school return for the following semester.
    Mar 140
  • Microsoft tfsUEwWt
    Of course.
    Mar 140
  • Microsoft Horseface
    Don’t mess with Aunt Becky!
    Mar 140

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