What is worse? Reneging in accepted offer or quitting within a month?

Mar 30 32 Comments

As title suggests, what is worse from a HM perspective? Candidate bailing on an accepted offer or leaving within their first month of joining?

Candidate perspective, is it worse from a career perspective to renege and potentially get blacklisted or quit within first month causing a lot of frustration and anger potentially.

Which would you do if confronted with said choice due to another better offer? Etc.

#Microsoft, #Lyft, #Uber, #Amazon, #Apple

132 VOTES SELECT ONLY ONE ANSWER
VOTE VIEW RESULT

comments

Want to comment? LOG IN or SIGN UP
TOP 32 Comments
  • I think it’s obvious, think about it:
    - Reneging: In a big corporation, an HM deals with many candidates, so even if we feel all eyes are on us, you are just one of many accepted candidates. Yes, it’s not ideal but an experienced HM should accept some candidates bailing and should be ready to spring to action to find a new person (maybe from an internal waitlist)

    - Quitting within first month: This sucks because people from the company have invested in you even if its for a month. And this investment is big. Imagine the IT department ensuring you have all hardware and software setup, your manager ensuring you have credentials and access, introductions made around, people showing you around, manager charting a plan for your career, training sessions etc. And now if you quit, you not only throw all their efforts in their face, but the issue becomes personal as you have met and interacted with a whole lot of people and are not just a name in the HM’s system. It also hurts morale, other employees may feel what they did wrong or if their culture is not good. Overall, not a good scenario and you really look like a jerk. Now, of course if you have a legitimate reason to quit such as sexual harassment etc then more power to your brother/sister
    Mar 30 1
    • OP
      I like your thorough response. Thanks
      Mar 30
  • Twitter hodgesodge
    Leaving in the first month obviously.
    Mar 30 0
  • Google / Ops Huhf13
    Leaving in first month is far worse
    Mar 30 7
    • Microsoft ssd32fg689
      Why? You didn't like the culture/team/manager/work/etc?
      Mar 30
    • Amgen yiXR75
      When is an acceptable time to quit though if you know it’s not a good fit but don’t want it to look weird on your resume when applying elsewhere? 6 months? 1 Year?
      Mar 30
    • Google MVou06
      Sandberg@, we all know its not illegal. It just burns bridge far worse than reneging on an offer.
      Mar 30
    • OP
      Than what is a good window 3 months, 4 months?
      Mar 30
    • Google / Eng BiggusD
      6 months is the earliest I'd consider passable, anything less than that you didn't even give it a shot.
      Mar 30
  • Indeed / Eng piiii
    Poll is almost 50 50, not sure if these are all by new grads. As a hiring manager, I have dealt with offer reneges several times in the past. It's not a big deal though it is very frustrating. Leaving within a month spoils the morale of the team and causes self doubt among employees if everything is normal in the company. As a hiring manager I'd say if you are not interested better let me know asap, rather than joining and pulling out.
    Mar 30 1
    • OP
      Appreciate the hiring manager perspective!
      Mar 30
  • Microsoft cantwinall
    Absolutely leaving within first month is worse for everyone involved—the hiring manager, the team, the organization, and equally importantly the candidate. Why would you d!ck around for a whole month of paperwork meetings ramp orientation socialisation when you know fully well that you’re leaving in a month? I’m actually shocked the poll is 5050, can’t possibly be people thinking this through.
    Mar 30 4
    • Microsoft cantwinall
      Actually I think I know why it’s 5050, your title says which is worse, and just before the poll you say which would you do. Pretty darn confusing.
      Mar 30
    • Twitter hodgesodge
      Yeah op is..... Special
      Mar 30
    • OP
      No I am surprised folks are fixated on the title - that is the entry point to the broader point; I am trying to determine multiple data points: first: which is worse? And what would blinders do if confronted with the circumstance of having to do one or other.
      Mar 31
    • OP
      Secondly candidate perspective, leaving first month doesn’t get you blacklisted; reneging on an offer most likely will
      Mar 31
  • OP
    Attached a poll as well
    Mar 30 3
    • Twitter hodgesodge
      Why? Its a dumb question. Both options have the same end result but one has a far larger cost. It's like saying what's the worst way to die, in your sleep or getting kicked in the balls and then shot.
      Mar 30
    • Intel / Eng DonaldDD's
      The poll sucks, the question is posed poorly. The last question is the inverse of the title.
      Quitting within a month is horrible
      Mar 30
    • OP
      No the question doesn’t suck maybe your perspective does? I am sincerely trying to decide which one would be best course from candidate and HM point of views
      Mar 30
  • Apple / Retail
    UCSF

    Apple Retail

    PRE
    BART
    UCSFmore
    I selected “reneging” as the poll is confusing and I do mean the opposite . I think people overwhelmingly think leaving in a month is the worst of worst.
    Mar 31 0
  • Adobe t3:
    Making this a poll. Leaving first month is disgusting.
    Mar 30 0
  • Google / Other
    snidely

    Google Other

    BIO
    Flagged by the community
    snidelymore
    If you start and leave they've invested more time in you. They've told other candidates to pound sand, etc.
    Mar 30 0
  • Google quix
    I didn't vote; because neither is bad. You need to do whatever is right for you. Companies have teams of lawyers, accountants and HR professionals to take care of their own interests.

    Remember - any company can withdraw their offer to you at any point in time. They can also fire you on your first day.

    Your only obligation is to work for them while they pay you.
    Mar 31 2
    • OP
      Thanks quix for your take; based on your opinion, then from a candidate perspective, is it better to work for a month and leave to avoid being blacklisted? Or don’t join at all and get blacklisted potentially?
      Mar 31
    • Google quix
      If I knew for sure that I wanted to work elsewhere - I'd just go join the 'elsewhere' and tell the recruiter - hey, I changed my mind; Ive decided that this is not the one for me.

      If they decide to blacklist me after that - thats cool. There are like millions of options right now for programmers. Who cares if a few of them wont hire me? I probably wouldnt want to work for such a vindictive place anyway
      Apr 1
  • Sina.com / Eng
    WLB

    Sina.com Eng

    PRE
    Facebook, Apple, Amazon, Netflix, Google
    BIO
    Software Engineer and former phd candidate in biophysics
    WLBmore
    Neither is good. However, business is business. If you showed interest again and i had headcount still, i would say welcome again.
    Mar 30 0
  • Amazon HAzq58
    Then what’s a more reasonable time to quit? 1 year?
    Mar 31 1
    • Indeed / Eng piiii
      Yes imo. I've seen people question less than a year in interview debriefs a lot especially if it was recent or s consistent pattern. Beyond 2 years no one would think much, 1 to 2 years depends but mostly should be fine.
      Mar 31
  • Amazon Fprs52
    Just ask your hm over an informal lunch and how would he/she deal with this. You may be surprised to hear their answer and choose to not leave
    Mar 30 0