Who Gentrifies?

Credit Karma EllisDee25
Apr 2 6 Comments

As I see it, while renters often get the blame, people who move to a city for a professional job just need housing and do not have a stake in gentrification and displacement of existing communities being the way this is accomplished. Same with gay communities who want an area that caters to their needs and might be freer from bigotry; same with art studios or hipsters looking for cheap rent and a district that caters to their needs. So, for me the gentrifiers are the banks and developers and city halls that see displacement and heavy-handed policing as the best way to take care of housing.

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TOP 6 Comments
  • Google PageRanker
    It is not the developers, it is the city halls. The solution to housing is to build lots and lots of it. For that to happen zoning needs to be relaxed and affordable housing mandates scrapped.
    Unfortunately people donโ€™t want housing built (which is why city halls restrict construction). Some if them end up displaced.
    Apr 2 1
  • Google d8kAne
    NIMBY homeowners/voters.

    Prop 13 needs to be sunset. If CA voters see their house as a place to live then they can vote for saner development laws and have prices come down to reality. Otherwise can eat ๐Ÿ’ฉ and pay their goddamn taxes on their 5x appreciation.
    Apr 2 0
  • OpenTable Meliodas
    A gentrifier is anyone wealthier that moves in after you do.
    Apr 2 1
    • Microsoft Pork chips
      Bam there you go! The answer is all of the above. Who elects city hall? Who gets loans from the banks? Who lives into the gentrified homes/apts? Itโ€™s a circle that completes once someone new moves in.
      Apr 2
  • Charles Schwab EGjV76
    To mitigate the effects of gentrification you need more housing units. To get more housing units you need to build vertically. To build vertically you need to be able to buy land and get zoning approval. And to do that you need the approval of the existing landowners. Affluent landowners halt this process via obstructionism and protest. Poorer neighborhoods do not resist as much, so that's why they're redeveloped more often than more affluent neighborhoods.
    Apr 2 0