Managers thinking for hiring candidate affected by layoff

Oath oecs07
Dec 30, 2017 18 Comments

Do you think managers have negative thoughts about hiring a candidate who was previously effected by layoff in his company? Any managers here?? Does it effect his growth in new company?

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TOP 18 Comments
  • Airbnb Tratou
    In my experience layoffs target the lowest performers. Of course that’s not always the case- sometimes entire groups get axed - but it seems to be the norm to let high performers within those groups stay on and find a job elsewhere within the company.
    Dec 30, 2017 3
    • Fitbit B.B.
      True, in the past when I’ve been required to cut headcount, I’ve always gotten rid of the weakest links. After all, it’s the most logical thing to do
      Dec 30, 2017
    • Microsoft
      User5

      Microsoft

      BIO
      This is my bio.
      User5more
      This is definitely not the case at Microsoft. Often performance isn't involved in the decision.
      Dec 30, 2017
  • AT&T / Ops
    DDM2K

    AT&T Ops

    PRE
    Windstream
    DDM2Kmore
    To make a blanket statement:

    Stating that you are laid off, apart from answering reasons for departure on an application, nets you no extra consideration or sympathy points when applying for a job.

    It may, for reasons contained in answers above, cause to be viewed “in a certain light” by some hiring managers and I don’t mean in a good way.

    Leave it undisclosed unless directly asked.
    Dec 30, 2017 0
  • If a manager or a company rejected me just because I was laid off and for that reason alone, I would rather not work with those people anyway. This is why,
    1) If they think I am a flight risk then they are insecure and/or don’t have anything interesting to keep me in that company.
    2) If they reject thinking I was the weakest link, then they just made a huge assumption. The assumption here is the previous company made the right decision in figuring out who are the weakest link and there was no politics involved. Let’s say for argument sake the previous company made absolutely no mistake in identifying the poor performers, still the question remains did they perform poorly because they were not good enough or the manager/company didn’t provide the right environment/projects for them to excel.
    Dec 30, 2017 4
    • Microsoft UMbR31
      OP is trying to find out if he/his friend should mention to the hiring team that they were laid off. OP's follow-on is: what is the implication of the manager getting to know later.

      I thought your points (and my reply) answer neither. You don't have the time or evergy to think about having dodged a bullet, feel dejected etc when you're looking for a job after layoff.
      Dec 30, 2017
    • I don’t see OP asking that question in his/her post. I don’t see any other messages from them in this thread. Did I miss something?
      Dec 30, 2017
  • Blippar selfuser
    Layoff may be a business decision or a cultural misfit decision or performance decision from past employer or elimination of the position. What does not work in one company may work better in another. Candidate has to provide good reason and this should be fine.
    Dec 30, 2017 0
  • AT&T / Ops
    DDM2K

    AT&T Ops

    PRE
    Windstream
    DDM2Kmore
    If you’re talking about an internal employee, having once been laid off and then recalled? Absolutely no issue. We have a process for that and it’s outlined in our union contract.

    A new hire, whose reason of separation from his last company was layoff, may be looked at under scrutiny because he may be subject to recall. He could be seen as a flight risk, believed to only be applying to your company as a second choice, etc.
    Dec 30, 2017 0
  • It wouldn’t matter to me and not to any of the managers in my company if I can speak for them.
    Dec 30, 2017 0
  • New / Sales Shitopia
    Being laid-off is different then being fired! In my interviews, no one seemed to care that I was one of hundreds let go.

    Where I was I had no choice to transfer to another position—all head count was frozen. It was after a merger.
    Jan 15, 2018 0
  • New / Ops
    IIBY67

    New Ops

    PRE
    Applied Materials
    BIO
    Longtime IT infrastructure nerd: Servers, storage, networks, cloud
    IIBY67more
    Well I can tell you at a semiconductor company I once worked at layoffs were constant. The group I was in once had 10 people in it. It was cut to 3, including my manager, after multiple layoffs and I was let go. They once had 30K FTEs (back in the 90s) and were below 10K when I was let go. Outsourced and contracted much of IT and even the highly technical engineering work for their tools, among many other areas. Typical semi company and Fortune 500. No loyalty. Director level and up were the only ones with a reasonable amount of security. I saw many very skilled IT engineers laid off. While honestly I wasn’t really that great of an employee - since I came in from their acquisition of a vastly smaller company I never felt like I was part of the company even though I landed in a great group with very good engineers - i did see many laid off that were top notch so I don’t think it’s necessarily all about merit-based layoffs.
    Dec 30, 2017 0
  • Microsoft / Mgmt
    4agK93

    Microsoft Mgmt

    PRE
    Amazon
    4agK93more
    Doesn’t affect growth once hired but could affect how a candidate is perceived by a recruiter or hiring manager. I’ve had some people explain getting laid off with lots of excuses and blame. “I had a terrible manager” and “the company had no idea what they were doing” etc doesn’t do the candidate any favors.
    Dec 30, 2017 0
  • CareerBuilder hdTI13
    no negative thoughts here
    Dec 30, 2017 0

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