Smoke seeping in

New / Eng React Deve
Nov 30, 2019 31 Comments

My neighbor smokes cigarettes and blunts in his apartment. And it seeps into my bedroom and bathroom. My landlord says smoking is allowed in the condo building; however, I was never told. Now that it's winter I can't open the windows for fresh air.

I have gone to the doctor and got an inhaler as well as a lung x-ray.

It took me a little while to figure out what was causing my coughing and phlegm.

I am on a yearlong lease. What is my best course of action?

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TOP 31 Comments
  • Micro Focus / Eng spresso
    Stop being a snowflake
    Nov 30, 2019 5
    • Google / Eng 5h17h34d5
      No, this is basic. He needs to protect himself.
      Nov 30, 2019
    • Clover Health 🤖beepboop
      Second hand smoke through a vent does not cause phlegm.
      Dec 3, 2019
  • Google SdrPikachu
    Which backwards state are you in where this is still legal?
    Nov 30, 2019 2
    • New / Eng React Deve
      OP
      Minnesota
      Nov 30, 2019
    • Docker / R&D
      SQL_Inject

      Docker R&D

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      SQL_Injectmore
      +1 reason for living in “elitist” California
      Nov 30, 2019
  • Juniper ekard
    An air purifier will definitely help but you have to buy the right one. HEPA filters are useless against smoke particles as they are too small. What you care about is activated carbon (aka charcoal). The more the better. Most air purifiers have too little and is used mainly for marketing. For smoke the best you can get is an Austin Air purifier with maxed out carbon option. IQ Air is also great but will set you back $1k+. I use 8 air purifiers in my home against wildfire smoke.
    Nov 30, 2019 9
    • Clover Health 🤖beepboop
      The majority of the particles are .1 and above.
      Dec 4, 2019
    • Juniper ekard
      I really didn't want to get into details here as this isn't the appropriate forum. I'll provide one last post and leave it to those interested to research on their own.

      Smoke "particles" ( wildfire, cigarette, your internal combustion engine, etc.) are composed of two phases. The larger particles, commonly referred to as particulate matter, are what HEPA was designed for. The smaller particles, the gases, are completely and totally untouched by HEPA filtration. This is a very important distinction. It's the gas phase toxins that you really have to worry about. This applies to cigarette smoke as well as air pollution from combustion in cars, factories, fires, etc. Take a look at the very first paragraph of the study you cite.

      "Tobacco smoke is a complex mixture of gaseous compounds and particulates."

      "Cigrette smoke made of gaseous pollutants as carbon monoxide (CO), sulphur dioxide (SO 2 ), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ), methane (CH 4 ), non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC), carbonyls and volatile organic compounds (VOCs); and particulate matter (PM) (Diapouli et al., 2011; Wang et al., 2012)."

      If you read and understood the study the figures in the study are only talking about the particulate matter in the cigarette smoke. The experiment is not talking about the gases as they are too small. Gases from cigarette smoke, NO, CO, etc, are literally about two to three atoms. The appropriate scale for atomic sizes would be angstroms not microns.

      The only way to get the very small particles, aka gases, from smoke is activated carbon. HEPA is totally useless here. Not a little useless. Completely useless. Consider this. Air is a gas. If a theoretical HEPA filter was dense enough to affect gas how would you move air through it ? In addition to removing CO and NO it would also remove O2 which most humans need.

      My recommendation to the OP's problem was to focus on activated carbon. Your cheap Costco special HEPA filter will not do the trick. A small piece of activated carbon, added to cheap HEPA filters for marketing purposes, will also not work. If you continue your research on what does work you will see that you need activated carbon in the pounds not oz because the active sites will saturate quickly. Activated carbon filters are expensive and most people are ignorant to why they are important (as proven in this forum). For this reason most manufacturers leave this out as they are profit driven. Their marketing can even boast that they "clean smoke" as it will have some affect on the larger particulate matter of smoke. They won't mention the majority of the toxins in smoke that it doesn't work on. Alas, it is the smallest particles that penetrate the deepest into your body and does the most damage.
      Dec 4, 2019
  • Amazon / Consultant gimme🍌🍌🍌
    You could get an air purifier and maybe it will help?
    Nov 30, 2019 4
    • Netflix the.oa
      Get the air filter. $100 at Costco. Don’t need to go overboard for some Dyson fancy pants device.
      Nov 30, 2019
    • Google / Eng 5h17h34d5
      Yes, I've bought 4 Winix air purifiers from Costco. When they go on sale they are around $100.
      Nov 30, 2019
  • Google
    GCoin

    Google

    PRE
    Apple
    GCoinmore
    I think if this is causing medical condition for you, you can break the lease without the penalty
    Nov 30, 2019 1
  • Smoke more and blow it directly into your neighbors apartment
    Nov 30, 2019 0
  • Microsoft h2ea
    Step 1: roll a bigger joint than neighbor
    Step 2: hotbox the whole condo
    Step 3: ?????
    Step 4: profit
    Nov 30, 2019 0
  • Google / Eng 5h17h34d5
    Try and find out where it's coming in from. Get a good air quality monitor to help pinpoint where it comes in and seal it. Or you could just try and gtfo asap.
    Nov 30, 2019 1
    • New / Eng React Deve
      OP
      I am going to research air monitors tomorrow
      Nov 30, 2019
  • Cisco g xx dhn
    BREAK THE LEASE. I think it will cost you one month rent....

    being December rents will be lower . so you can easily find a new place
    Dec 8, 2019 0

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