Given mediocre intelligence what is the best leetcoding strategy

Chase / Eng ghosted!
Feb 3 18 Comments

This poll applies to learning new things in general. Do you believe in practice makes perfect, or thinking makes perfect. Obviously it's not binary but a spectrum, but which side do you fall more on?

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TOP 18 Comments
  • Salesforce Bag Head
    Just accept your place in society like me 😢
    Feb 3 2
    • New @(^_^)@
      <3 u bag head
      Feb 3
    • Microsoft abso7
      Grind for a msft position and become a lifer
      Feb 4
  • New / Eng michalumni
    I would say just grind quantity — eventually you will start to just see the patterns when you grind enough of them. Also you are more likely this way to encounter one of them on an actual interview.
    Feb 3 0
  • Facebook / Eng 5'6"Indian
    If I could get in, so can you. Keep practicing
    Feb 3 0
  • General Motors / Eng
    bruh2000

    General Motors Eng

    PRE
    Boeing, Lockheed Martin, General Motors
    BIO
    Full stack developer with 6+ years of experience. I enjoy problem-solving, learning, and knowledge sharing.
    bruh2000more
    Im on the same page. My strategy is not to peek at any solution until i can crank out at least one solution even if it is not the most optimal. I then revisit the solution and optimize the speed as best as i can, then revisit a third time and try to reduce down the memory usage. Once I can’t optimize the solution any longer, then i look at better solutions to learn how to do it better. I then implement using the better strategy and consider problem completed and move on to the next random problem.
    Feb 3 0
  • LinkedIn Duck Pond
    I’d say approach preparation like a marathon rather than a sprint. Do a large number of questions, but try to categorize them into various patterns so that you’ll know the pattern when you see a new question. I tend to think about tougher questions (or new type of questions) for a few days, revising them in my head to make sure I internalize them. Found this helps in not forgetting things that I’ve covered.
    Feb 3 0
  • Amazon LoanerBadg
    Maybe do things to increase your intelligence?
    Feb 3 0
  • Snapchat gqkO66
    Quantity for interviews. Quality if you actually care about being smarter.
    Feb 3 1
    • Microsoft puyo
      This is the right answer
      Feb 3
  • New ofnes97
    The give up strategy will bring you long term happiness
    Feb 3 0
  • New ktFx33
    If you’re unhappy with your performance just keep on. Eventually the problems become noticeably easier. It’s like an iq test.. the more you take the better you score
    Feb 3 0
  • Amazon ncitant
    What people don’t realize is that once you do enough of them there are around only 20-30 strategies for the kind of problems solvable in 30 mins in an interview...

    Practice and Coverage on all those patterns will get you there.

    System is a different ballgame and comes with experience only.
    Feb 3 1
    • New / Eng michalumni
      How do you attack system design, let’s say from a limited experience pov. Would designing data intensive applications be a good place to start?
      Feb 3
  • Snapchat uOkV57
    Probably both, just like decision making, you want quantity to make sure you traverse and cover enough topics (i.e. exploration), but you also want quality to conclude and form your own strategy and ideas (i.e. exploitation).
    Feb 3 1
    • Google / Eng
      LeeJaeDong

      Google Eng

      PRE
      Amazon
      LeeJaeDongmore
      Nice analogy.
      Feb 3
  • Amazon / Eng tylium
    Procedural memory. When you have done similar problems multiple times you will nail them. Quality is just as important. The answer is both.
    Feb 3 0
  • Google fblowball
    I am below mediocre. Just solve as many problems as you can.
    Feb 3 0